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Who We Are

We envision a Canadian culture which embraces and values the artistic, economic, contemporary, historical and social significance of craft.

Mission Statement

 

Create connections and champion craft

 

Mandate

 

As a Federation of organizations, the CCF/FCMA works with the Provincial and Territorial Craft Councils and affiliate organizations to unite, enrich, empower and celebrate the professional contemporary craft sector through collaborative action, networking, and community development.

Approach

 

  • We unite Canadian professional craft organizations in order to learn, share, collaborate, and strengthen the sector.
  • We create and deliver programming and research that informs, engages, empowers, and celebrates the professional craft sector.
  • We identify and act on craft based projects and collaborations that have regional, national, and international impact.
  • We actively pursue and develop meaningful relationships with organizations, institutions, and government agencies that are committed to the advancement of the craft sector.
  • We advocate for craft from a national perspective.

History

1900

National craft organizations in Canada date back to 1900, starting with the foundation of the Canadian Guild of Crafts.

 

1974

In 1974, a number of craft organizations and guilds merged to create the Canadian Crafts Council (CCC). The CCC provided structure and a forum to unify and represent Canadian craftspeople nationally and internationally. Originally, it was intended as an organization of provincial crafts councils, but over the years, membership privileges were extended to other crafts organizations, honorary members, and in 1996, to individual craftspeople.

 

1996

Funding from the Department of Canadian Heritage, membership fees, contributions, contract revenues and donations from the private sector (principally from the M. Joan Chalmers Cultural Centre Foundation – MJCCCF) supported the CCC’s activities, which focused primarily on the actions of the federal government that interfaced with crafts and craftspeople. As of 1996, federal funding to the CCC was discontinued, as was the support from the MJCCCF. At this point the staff was laid off and the office in Ottawa was closed.
 
The CCC continued on without an office, staff, or funding through the energetic efforts of a small band of five volunteers who formed a transition board and who kept the CCC alive as a continuing legal entity but without any programming ability.

 

1998

In May of 1998, representatives of provincial crafts councils met with officers of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and The Canada Council for the Arts in Montreal to debate the future of a national organization for crafts in Canada.
 
From the discussions and ideas shared at this meeting, it was evident that a crafts organization at the national level was of vital and continuing importance. An organization that would collaborate with all provincial councils was required. An organization that would focus on the representation and international marketing of Canadian crafts, share information from international, national and provincial levels to the Canadian crafts community, and provide a conduit and information link between the community and the federal government.
 
To accomplish this, the CCC transformed into a national network for crafts to be known as the Canadian Crafts Federation / Fédération canadienne des métiers d’art (CCF/FCMA). The CCC’s charitable tax status was transferred to the CCF/FCMA. Despite challenges with funding and personnel constraints, the new organization attempted to address national issues and to provide a forum for discussion and action on matters of common concern amongst the provinces.
 
The CCF/FCMA thereby came into being as an organization of national consensus, mutual discussion and decision making.

 

1999

The first Annual General Meeting of the CCF/FCMA was held by conference call in September 1999, and a slate of officers were elected. A coordinating secretariat rotated as required amongst the ten councils. The Ontario Crafts Council (now known as Craft Ontario) was the first to provide this service.

 

2007

In partnership with the New Brunswick Crafts Council and The New Brunswick College of Craft and Design, the CCF/FCMA’s head office transferred to Fredericton, New Brunswick, where the headquarters reside to this day.

 

2017–2020 Strategic Plan

The CCF/FCMA is proud to present our Strategic Plan for 2017–2020. After a year long process of visioning, deliberation, and consultation, our Board of Directors have approved the organizations new and expanded goals, objectives and initiatives. The CCF/FCMA’s three new goals are to “Unite, Support and Inspire”, encouraging connection and exchange among the national craft network, strengthening and empowering the craft sector, and raising the profile of Canadian contemporary fine craft nationally and internationally.

 

Unite: Encourage connection and exchange among the national craft network

The CCF/FCMA is first and foremost, a federation. Our primary goal is to connect the distinctive professional facets of the Canadian contemporary craft sector, embracing the diverse resources of our membership to form a vibrant national craft network. Through the facilitation of craft-focused gatherings and the distribution of craft-focused information, we create and share opportunities, spark conversation and open doors to strengthen the craft sector.

 

Support: Strengthen and empower the craft sector

The CCF/FCMA recognizes the great strength of collective craft community action. We provide connections, information and encouragement to the national craft network, ensuring that the craft sector is represented and recognized as a thriving component of Canadian culture.

 

Inspire: Raise the profile of Canadian contemporary fine craft nationally and internationally

The CCF/FCMA is proud to promote the unique contemporary fine craft sector of our country. Craft is one of the many languages of our culture, a means to celebrate who we are and the values we share. We showcase Canadian craft, elevating its status as a respected art form and increasing recognition of Contemporary fine craft as a reflective, engaging and inspiring contributor to Canadian culture.

 

Intrigued? Read the Strategic Plan here.

RJA_Colour_300ppi

The Robert Jekyll Award for Leadership (previously titled The Robert Jekyll President’s Award) celebrates distinguished contributors to the craft sector, and is one of the highest markers of exceptional commitment to the development of the craft community in Canada.

 

The Robert Jekyll Award for Leadership is a prestigious honour, reflecting its namesake. The founding president of the CCF/FCMA, Jekyll helped guide the organization through a time of overwhelming change, leading to the presence we have today. While he is known for over 30 years of remarkable stained glass work, he is also respected as a major force in the creative community at large,advancing the status of Canadian craft across the country. To be a recipient of this award is to be recognized as an invaluable citizen of craft.

 

2017 Nomination Deadline: May 5th, 2017
Robert Jekyll Award Call for Nominations 2017

 

Previous Award Winners Include:

2006: Robert Jekyll, Ontario & Charles Lewton-Brain, Alberta
2007: Jean Johnson, Ontario
2010: Marilyn Stothers, Manitoba
2012: Simon Wroot, Alberta
2013: Jane Kenyon, British Columbia
2014: Deborah Dumka, British Columbia
2015: Ann Roberts, Ontario
2016: Michael Hosaluk, Saskatchewan
2017: Charllotte Kwon, British Columbia

 

The video below shares the message of the award, and highlights the work of it’s namesake, Mr. Robert Jekyll. Filmed by Claire Sanford.

 

 

CCF/FCMA Director

Maegen Black

telephone : 506-462-9560, email : maegen@canadiancraftsfederation.ca

mailing address : P.O. Box 1231, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5C8

 

President and Regional Representative, Ontario:

Sandra Dupret

sandra.dupret_at_flemingcollege.ca

 

Past President:

Gilles Latour

rmgl_at_sympatico.ca

 

First Vice President

Kim Bent

kim.bent_at_unb.ca

 

Treasurer and Regional Representative, Yukon

Glenn Piwowar

gpiwowar_at_northwestel.net

 

Secretary

Linda Brine

shop_at_canadianclayandglass.ca

 

Regional Representative, British Columbia

Lou Lynn

loulynn_at_netidea.com

 

Regional Representative, Yukon

Glenn Piwowar

gpiwowar_at_northwestel.net

 

Regional Representative, Alberta

Tara Owen

taraowen_at_shaw.ca

 

Regional Representative, Saskatchewan

David Freeman

timelessgtrs_at_sasktel.net

 

Regional Representative, Manitoba

Alison Norberg

alison_norberg_at_hotmail.com

 

Regional Representative, Ontario

Sandra Dupret

sandra.dupret_at_flemingcollege.ca

 

Regional Representative, Nunavut

Jesse Tungilik

jesse_at_nacaarts.org

 

Regional Representative, Quebec

Luc Delavigne

luc.delavigne_at_metiersdart.ca

 

Interim Regional Representative, Prince Edward Island

Lily Reaman

peicraftscouncil_at_gmail.com

 

Regional Representative, New Brunswick

Jamie Brown

jsab1975_at_live.com

 

Interim Regional Representative, Nova Scotia

Susan Hanrahan

susan_at_nsdcc.ns.ca

 

Regional Representative, Newfoundland and Labrador

David Hayashida

dlhayashida_at_gmail.com

1900

National craft organizations in Canada date back to 1900, starting with the foundation of the Canadian Guild of Crafts.

 

1974

In 1974, a number of craft organizations and guilds merged to create the Canadian Crafts Council (CCC). The CCC provided structure and a forum to unify and represent Canadian craftspeople nationally and internationally. Originally, it was intended as an organization of provincial crafts councils, but over the years, membership privileges were extended to other crafts organizations, honorary members, and in 1996, to individual craftspeople.

 

1996

Funding from the Department of Canadian Heritage, membership fees, contributions, contract revenues and donations from the private sector (principally from the M. Joan Chalmers Cultural Centre Foundation – MJCCCF) supported the CCC’s activities, which focused primarily on the actions of the federal government that interfaced with crafts and craftspeople. As of 1996, federal funding to the CCC was discontinued, as was the support from the MJCCCF. At this point the staff was laid off and the office in Ottawa was closed.
 
The CCC continued on without an office, staff, or funding through the energetic efforts of a small band of five volunteers who formed a transition board and who kept the CCC alive as a continuing legal entity but without any programming ability.

 

1998

In May of 1998, representatives of provincial crafts councils met with officers of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and The Canada Council for the Arts in Montreal to debate the future of a national organization for crafts in Canada.
 
From the discussions and ideas shared at this meeting, it was evident that a crafts organization at the national level was of vital and continuing importance. An organization that would collaborate with all provincial councils was required. An organization that would focus on the representation and international marketing of Canadian crafts, share information from international, national and provincial levels to the Canadian crafts community, and provide a conduit and information link between the community and the federal government.
 
To accomplish this, the CCC transformed into a national network for crafts to be known as the Canadian Crafts Federation / Fédération canadienne des métiers d’art (CCF/FCMA). The CCC’s charitable tax status was transferred to the CCF/FCMA. Despite challenges with funding and personnel constraints, the new organization attempted to address national issues and to provide a forum for discussion and action on matters of common concern amongst the provinces.
 
The CCF/FCMA thereby came into being as an organization of national consensus, mutual discussion and decision making.

 

1999

The first Annual General Meeting of the CCF/FCMA was held by conference call in September 1999, and a slate of officers were elected. A coordinating secretariat rotated as required amongst the ten councils. The Ontario Crafts Council (now known as Craft Ontario) was the first to provide this service.

 

2007

In partnership with the New Brunswick Crafts Council and The New Brunswick College of Craft and Design, the CCF/FCMA’s head office transferred to Fredericton, New Brunswick, where the headquarters reside to this day.

 

2017–2020 Strategic Plan

The CCF/FCMA is proud to present our Strategic Plan for 2017–2020. After a year long process of visioning, deliberation, and consultation, our Board of Directors have approved the organizations new and expanded goals, objectives and initiatives. The CCF/FCMA’s three new goals are to “Unite, Support and Inspire”, encouraging connection and exchange among the national craft network, strengthening and empowering the craft sector, and raising the profile of Canadian contemporary fine craft nationally and internationally.

 

Unite: Encourage connection and exchange among the national craft network

The CCF/FCMA is first and foremost, a federation. Our primary goal is to connect the distinctive professional facets of the Canadian contemporary craft sector, embracing the diverse resources of our membership to form a vibrant national craft network. Through the facilitation of craft-focused gatherings and the distribution of craft-focused information, we create and share opportunities, spark conversation and open doors to strengthen the craft sector.

 

Support: Strengthen and empower the craft sector

The CCF/FCMA recognizes the great strength of collective craft community action. We provide connections, information and encouragement to the national craft network, ensuring that the craft sector is represented and recognized as a thriving component of Canadian culture.

 

Inspire: Raise the profile of Canadian contemporary fine craft nationally and internationally

The CCF/FCMA is proud to promote the unique contemporary fine craft sector of our country. Craft is one of the many languages of our culture, a means to celebrate who we are and the values we share. We showcase Canadian craft, elevating its status as a respected art form and increasing recognition of Contemporary fine craft as a reflective, engaging and inspiring contributor to Canadian culture.

 

Intrigued? Read the Strategic Plan here.

RJA_Colour_300ppi

The Robert Jekyll Award for Leadership (previously titled The Robert Jekyll President’s Award) celebrates distinguished contributors to the craft sector, and is one of the highest markers of exceptional commitment to the development of the craft community in Canada.

 

The Robert Jekyll Award for Leadership is a prestigious honour, reflecting its namesake. The founding president of the CCF/FCMA, Jekyll helped guide the organization through a time of overwhelming change, leading to the presence we have today. While he is known for over 30 years of remarkable stained glass work, he is also respected as a major force in the creative community at large,advancing the status of Canadian craft across the country. To be a recipient of this award is to be recognized as an invaluable citizen of craft.

 

2017 Nomination Deadline: May 5th, 2017
Robert Jekyll Award Call for Nominations 2017

 

Previous Award Winners Include:

2006: Robert Jekyll, Ontario & Charles Lewton-Brain, Alberta
2007: Jean Johnson, Ontario
2010: Marilyn Stothers, Manitoba
2012: Simon Wroot, Alberta
2013: Jane Kenyon, British Columbia
2014: Deborah Dumka, British Columbia
2015: Ann Roberts, Ontario
2016: Michael Hosaluk, Saskatchewan
2017: Charllotte Kwon, British Columbia

 

The video below shares the message of the award, and highlights the work of it’s namesake, Mr. Robert Jekyll. Filmed by Claire Sanford.

 

 

CCF/FCMA Director

Maegen Black

telephone : 506-462-9560, email : maegen@canadiancraftsfederation.ca

mailing address : P.O. Box 1231, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5C8

 

President and Regional Representative, Ontario:

Sandra Dupret

sandra.dupret_at_flemingcollege.ca

 

Past President:

Gilles Latour

rmgl_at_sympatico.ca

 

First Vice President

Kim Bent

kim.bent_at_unb.ca

 

Treasurer and Regional Representative, Yukon

Glenn Piwowar

gpiwowar_at_northwestel.net

 

Secretary

Linda Brine

shop_at_canadianclayandglass.ca

 

Regional Representative, British Columbia

Lou Lynn

loulynn_at_netidea.com

 

Regional Representative, Yukon

Glenn Piwowar

gpiwowar_at_northwestel.net

 

Regional Representative, Alberta

Tara Owen

taraowen_at_shaw.ca

 

Regional Representative, Saskatchewan

David Freeman

timelessgtrs_at_sasktel.net

 

Regional Representative, Manitoba

Alison Norberg

alison_norberg_at_hotmail.com

 

Regional Representative, Ontario

Sandra Dupret

sandra.dupret_at_flemingcollege.ca

 

Regional Representative, Nunavut

Jesse Tungilik

jesse_at_nacaarts.org

 

Regional Representative, Quebec

Luc Delavigne

luc.delavigne_at_metiersdart.ca

 

Interim Regional Representative, Prince Edward Island

Lily Reaman

peicraftscouncil_at_gmail.com

 

Regional Representative, New Brunswick

Jamie Brown

jsab1975_at_live.com

 

Interim Regional Representative, Nova Scotia

Susan Hanrahan

susan_at_nsdcc.ns.ca

 

Regional Representative, Newfoundland and Labrador

David Hayashida

dlhayashida_at_gmail.com